The excavation was carried out in a long narrow strip (10 × 80 m), and fifteen elliptical buildings (I–XV; Figs. 2, 3) dating from Early Bronze Age IA were uncovered. Most of the walls were preserved for a single course.
Building I (c. 10 m long). A wall (0.65 m wide, 0.1–0.3 m high), built of two stone rows, was preserved for a single course. A pillar base to support the ceiling was unearthed in the northern part of the building.
Building II (c. 10 m long). Only the southern part of the building was preserved. A two-row stone wall was uncovered, although for the most part, only one row was preserved.
Building III (Fig. 4). Two parallel walls constructed of two rows of roughly hewn stones were unearthed. Only the western part of the building was excavated, uncovering walls preserved for four courses (0.7 m max. height).
Building IV. A wall preserved for a single course was unearthed. Since the northwestern part of the building was cut by Building XIII, it is possible that there was more than one construction phase within EB IA.
Building V (Figs. 5, 6). In the northwestern part of the building, walls built of two stone rows and preserved for a single course were exposed.
Building VI (see Fig. 6). Only the western and southern parts of the building were excavated. A wall, built of two rows of roughly dressed stones with an inner core of small limestones, was uncovered, its construction thus differing from the construction of the walls of the other buildings.  
Buildings VII, VIII. Only wall stumps were preserved.
Building IX. Walls were unearthed next to the balk. A flat stone base, uncovered in the center of the square, may have been a pillar base.
Building X. Only the northwestern part of the building was excavated, exposing a partition wall. A circular installation built of two limestone courses, possibly a granary, was uncovered next to the eastern wall of the building.
Building XI. A truncated wall was uncovered, and a massive pillar base was discovered in the center of the building. The southern and eastern parts of the building were not preserved.
Buildings XII, XIII. Truncated walls were exposed, with pillar bases in the middle of the buildings.
Building XIV. A partition wall (4 m long) built on a west–east axis was exposed in the building. In the southern room, two copper axes were discovered lying on a layer of potsherds.
Building XV. A wall was uncovered next to the western section of the excavation square. The southern part of the building had swept down the slope.
 
The settlement extended beyond the excavation limits: towards Highway 70 to the east, further up the tell towards the west, and c. 20 m to the north. The excavated settlement was dated by the pottery and flint finds to EB IA. It was occupied for a short period of time, and the paucity of finds indicates that it was abandoned in an organized manner and not resettled. Renewed settlement in the vicinity is evident in EB IB at Tel Qashish, situated on the eastern bank of Nahal Qishon (van den Brink and ‘Ad 2011; van den Brink 2014; Zuckerman 2003). It is not known why the EB IA settlement chose the western side of the river, while in EB IB, the eastern bank was preferred. The EB IA settlement at Tel Wa’ar is contemporary to the Stratum II settlement at Yiftah’el, a key site in the region dated from the beginning of the EB I period (Braun 1997).