A single excavation square was opened, revealing remains of a residential building constructed in the Umayyad period that continued to be inhabited during the ‘Abbasid period (eighth–tenth centuries CE). Two rooms (R1, R2; Fig. 2) were partially revealed, their walls (W10–W13) built of medium-sized and large basalt stones, some of them fieldstones and others well-dressed, and preserved to a height of two courses. The walls were founded on a layer of dark gray alluvium containing Late Bronze Age pottery sherds.
 
Room R1 was rectangular. Only the southern part was excavated as the northern part extended beyond the excavation limits. The floor of the room (L104) consisted of tamped soil mixed with ash and small basalt stones. Above the floor was a layer of collapsed basalt building stones and light gray soil containing pottery sherds, including the base of a bowl from the Byzantine period (Fig. 3:1) and two jars from the Umayyad period (Fig. 3:2, 3).
Room R2. The eastern part of the room was exposed; the western part continued beyond the excavation boundaries. The floor of the room (L101) was like that in Room 1. A layer of collapsed basalt building stones and light gray soil containing fragments of jars from the Umayyad period (Fig. 3:4–6) and a jug from the ‘Abbasid period (Fig. 3:7) was exposed above the floor. A ceramic lamp dating to the Umayyad period (Fig. 3:8) was found south of the two rooms.
 
No remains predating the Umayyad period were discovered in the excavation. Thus, it seems that the settlement from the Late Bronze Age until the Byzantine period at Horbat Beit Jann was smaller than the settlement from the Umayyad period and did not extend beyond the area of ​​the ruin.